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Overview of the proposed Kenya National Art Gallery

By KARI MUTU

It has been over 50 years since the idea of ​​the National Art Gallery of Kenya (Nagok) was first brought up, and there finally seems to be hope for its realization.

As a forerunner in the creation of the gallery, the National Museums of Kenya (NMK) is currently hosting an exhibition at the Nairobi museum called Kesho Kutwa (the day after tomorrow), until October 15.

This exhibit is a preview of what to expect once Nagok is established and open to the public. “A combination of works of art from Kenya’s best contemporary artists and historically significant pieces from NMK’s permanent collection,” said Kibunjia Mzalendo, Managing Director of NMK, at the opening of the exhibition.

A photo from the exhibition shows the long timeline of the project. Joseph Murumbi, Kenya’s late Second Vice President and great supporter of the arts, introduced the idea of ​​a state gallery in the 1960s. His extensive collection of African art, cultural objects, books, cards and stamps, kept at the National Archives of Kenya, is arguably the largest assemblage of an African.

Spectacular pieces

In the 1970s, the National Archives building in Nairobi was proposed to house a national art gallery, an idea supported by Sisi kwa Sisi artists and then a group of indigenous Kenyan artists. But a change in political priorities killed the idea and the artists dissolved.

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The project is dead too. There was not much government-led or supported art activity in the 1980s and 1990s, although local galleries, art collectives, and donor-run businesses kept the creative scene alive. In 2006, there was another unsuccessful attempt to establish a national gallery dedicated to Kenyan art.

It was not until 2018 that the Nagok task force was officially formed and the first workshop was held in 2019, bringing together a range of visual arts actors. Although Covid-19 disrupted project planning in 2020, the Nagok committee now hopes to present a memo before the end of this year.

Kesho Kutwa is a well-curated exhibition with spectacular works of art by five contemporary artists: Peterson Kamwathi is one of Kenya’s most exciting second generation artists.

Working across a wide range of media, Kamwathi’s highly symbolic art tends to revisit socio-political themes. His Kesho Kutwa paintings of men carrying children on their shoulders or of individuals performing acrobatic stunts explore individual and collective circumstances.

Untitled by Michael Wafula. His abstract works are deep and thought-provoking. PHOTO | KARI MUTU

A low-key but deep person, Michael Wafula is not seen much in the public arena but works quietly with a small group of artists. His brightly colored abstract paintings are eye-catching at first, then a longer look reveals much more. Wafula applies several coats of paint and then scratches carefully to expose numerous symbols that keep the viewer staring for a long time.

Remove diapers

Beatrice Wanjiku’s lively personality belies a deep thought process that produces figurative images in a raw, penetrating, somewhat somber style. His grim illustrations of rib cage torsos at Kesho Kutwa speak of the “elimination of diapers by” the Covid pandemic.

By Peter ‘Ghose’ Ngugi, a remarkable self-taught artist, are larger-than-life portraits of elegantly dressed people. His silhouettes with faceless and faceless gestures, animated and surrounded by African fabric patterns have a captivating familiarity with them.

At first, Dennis Muraguri’s large, colorful matatu art scenes look like ordinary paintings, but they are in fact woodcuts, produced in a long and intense process. Working on wooden blocks, he cuts out vehicles, people and buildings and paints them meticulously.

Kesho Kutwa also features Kenyan artifacts from thousands of years ago. Miniature pottery figurines of cattle, discovered in the Turkana Basin and dated to around 4000 BC.

A rich collection of prehistoric artefacts, rock art and traditional artefacts is housed at the NMK, which suffers from inadequate exhibition space, which contributes to poor public awareness.

Compiling, organizing and exhibiting the history of visual arts in Kenya is one of Nagok’s goals.

The proposed facility will include a visual arts education center for young people.


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Open-air art gallery Exhibition space created – The Ukiah Daily Journal

Hope is the feathered thing that perches in the soul, and sings the melody without the words, and never stops at all… – Emily Dickinson

When Annie Ruygt moved to a small town in the midst of a global pandemic, she created a perfect formula for making the loneliness worse, for experiencing exponential isolation.

Having lived in Napa to be close to her family, she got engaged to Eliott Bernard, a teacher at Redwood / Accelerated Achievement Academy, and moved to Ukiah in July 2020 to live with her future husband.

As an illustrator and author, she knows well the loneliness imposed by her vocation, but it was of a different order.

“I was working from home, completely isolated, unable to meet anyone, looking for a way to make a public art form,” she says. “I was ready for anything. “

She wanted to paint murals on the Palace Hotel, but finding out that it was privately owned and would require permits, she contacted the Arts Council and was directed to the Ukiah City Program Administrator, Neil Davis.

This, in turn, led her to collaborate with the city to create the new Alex Thomas Plaza outdoor art gallery to recognize “that the arts, creative endeavors and culture embody a great deal of wisdom, of the articulated intellect and imagination of mankind and reflect the unique way in which the people of Ukiah City express themselves through the arts. Public expression of the arts, creative endeavors, and culture can aid the process of strong emotions, including grief and loss experienced during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. “

Untitled. “This one was inspired by the feeling of being completely isolated; I was walking outside and it was like a ghost town, ”says Annie Ruygt, illustrator and musician.

The new exhibition space aims to enhance the aesthetics of the Alex Thomas Plaza, provide a public place for local artists to display their work, and serve as a springboard to increase the amount of public art in the city.

Annie worked with her sister, a theater production manager and set designer in the creation of her outdoor exhibit — five acrylic panels, each approximately 4 feet by 3 feet — designing the series to reflect on the past year and a half of ” roller coaster emotions and a cultural touch ”, expressing his feelings around the negatives and positives of the loneliness induced by the pandemic.

After listening to a few of his solo acts and a few others accompanied by community musicians Sid Bishop and Jared Soinila, we moved on to the first piece in his series which depicts a neighborhood of houses of varying sizes with an orange light. fluorescent coming out of their windows. , a handful of trees and a small solitary figure winding through streets devoid of any other living being.

“This one was inspired by feeling completely isolated, not seeing anyone, not knowing where I was in this city, knowing that people were there to do activities, seeing them completely isolated in their own home and wanting to be able to connect with them. I was walking outside and it was like a ghost town.

“I did 10 day meditation retreats, but it was different: at the end of these retreats, I could still go home and visit a friend; the worst part about it was not knowing when it would end.

Untitled. Zoom fatigue.

She explains that she was no stranger to the feelings associated with isolation before the pandemic. An author and illustrator, she works alone all day and has moved around a lot over the past five years.

“It was very familiar, but this time everyone was experiencing it. It’s not that easy as an adult to make new friends. I walked around knowing I was anonymous to everyone; I was trying to find places I could hook up but when it’s all gone, when there’s no yoga studio, no coffee, what do you do?

The next panel, with a similar theme, shows rows of houses casting a warm orange light into the night with figures and Christmas trees inside.

“I look inside. I remember taking a lot of walks and seeing the Christmas trees and the people in their homes, knowing that I wouldn’t have the chance to go to my family for Christmas.”

Connecting with friends and family, singing holiday songs on Facetime and Zoom, texting, all alleviated some of his connection desires, but also led to a sense of loss in internet feeds and to Zoom’s fatigue, so graphically depicted with a self-portrait of her sitting in front of her computer, her head slumped on the keyboard and thick orange, yellow, green and blue threads slipping her laptop out of the canvas.

“I’m still recovering from this and can’t be on my computer all day.”

Unlimited growth

The last in the series but the first she painted, very different from the others in style and theme, the only one with a title — Growth in Solitude — shows a male figure seated in the middle of a spray of newly multicolored flowers. shoots, surrounded by vines, overlooking a lush hill of trees and purple mountains.

“My own internal growth turned out to have to come to terms with this new reality; it also gave me time to contemplate what I was doing with my art. It forced me to do this new kind of work, which I really enjoy.

She says it is rare for her to paint and rare for her to do public art; she usually draws by hand on an iPad and publishes her work on the Internet.

“I was on the internet all the time for work and when my social life had to be on the internet too, I hit my threshold. It pushed me to put myself in my hands, to connect with people through art in a real way, to prepare to go back out into the world and be more connected. I learned what I really want to do.

For more information on submitting works for exhibition, visit www.ukiahpublicart.org or contact Marianne Davison at 707-467-5765, [email protected] or Annie Ruygt at [email protected]


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Art gallery

Open-air art gallery Exhibition space created – The Ukiah Daily Journal

Hope is the feathered thing that perches in the soul, and sings the melody without the words, and never stops at all… – Emily Dickinson

When Annie Ruygt moved to a small town in the midst of a global pandemic, she created a perfect formula for making the loneliness worse, for experiencing exponential isolation.

Having lived in Napa to be close to her family, she got engaged to Eliott Bernard, a teacher at Redwood / Accelerated Achievement Academy, and moved to Ukiah in July 2020 to live with her future husband.

As an illustrator and author, she knows well the loneliness imposed by her vocation, but it was of a different order.

“I was working from home, completely isolated, unable to meet anyone, looking for a way to make a public art form,” she says. “I was ready for anything. “

She wanted to paint murals on the Palace Hotel, but finding out that it was privately owned and would require permits, she contacted the Arts Council and was directed to the Ukiah City Program Administrator, Neil Davis.

This, in turn, led her to collaborate with the city to create the new Alex Thomas Plaza outdoor art gallery to recognize “that the arts, creative endeavors and culture embody a great deal of wisdom, of the articulated intellect and imagination of mankind and reflect the unique way in which the people of Ukiah City express themselves through the arts. Public expression of the arts, creative endeavors, and culture can aid the process of strong emotions, including grief and loss experienced during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. “

Untitled. “This one was inspired by the feeling of being completely isolated; I was walking outside and it was like a ghost town, ”says Annie Ruygt, illustrator and musician.

The new exhibition space aims to enhance the aesthetics of the Alex Thomas Plaza, provide a public place for local artists to display their work, and serve as a springboard to increase the amount of public art in the city.

Annie worked with her sister, a theater production manager and set designer in the creation of her outdoor exhibit — five acrylic panels, each approximately 4 feet by 3 feet — designing the series to reflect on the past year and a half of ” roller coaster emotions and a cultural touch ”, expressing his feelings around the negatives and positives of the loneliness induced by the pandemic.

After listening to a few of his solo acts and a few others accompanied by community musicians Sid Bishop and Jared Soinila, we moved on to the first piece in his series which depicts a neighborhood of houses of varying sizes with an orange light. fluorescent coming out of their windows. , a handful of trees and a small solitary figure winding through streets devoid of any other living being.

“This one was inspired by feeling completely isolated, not seeing anyone, not knowing where I was in this city, knowing that people were there to do activities, seeing them completely isolated in their own home and wanting to be able to connect with them. I was walking outside and it was like a ghost town.

“I did 10 day meditation retreats, but it was different: at the end of these retreats, I could still go home and visit a friend; the worst part about it was not knowing when it would end.

Untitled. Zoom fatigue.

She explains that she was no stranger to the feelings associated with isolation before the pandemic. An author and illustrator, she works alone all day and has moved around a lot over the past five years.

“It was very familiar, but this time everyone was experiencing it. It’s not that easy as an adult to make new friends. I walked around knowing I was anonymous to everyone; I was trying to find places I could hook up but when it’s all gone, when there’s no yoga studio, no coffee, what do you do?

The next panel, with a similar theme, shows rows of houses casting a warm orange light into the night with figures and Christmas trees inside.

“I look inside. I remember taking a lot of walks and seeing the Christmas trees and the people in their homes, knowing that I wouldn’t have the chance to go to my family for Christmas.”

Connecting with friends and family, singing holiday songs on Facetime and Zoom, texting, all alleviated some of his connection desires, but also led to a sense of loss in internet feeds and to Zoom’s fatigue, so graphically depicted with a self-portrait of her sitting in front of her computer, her head slumped on the keyboard and thick orange, yellow, green and blue threads slipping her laptop out of the canvas.

“I’m still recovering from this and can’t be on my computer all day.”

Unlimited growth

The last in the series but the first she painted, very different from the others in style and theme, the only one with a title — Growth in Solitude — shows a male figure seated in the middle of a spray of newly multicolored flowers. shoots, surrounded by vines, overlooking a lush hill of trees and purple mountains.

“My own internal growth turned out to have to come to terms with this new reality; it also gave me time to contemplate what I was doing with my art. It forced me to do this new kind of work, which I really enjoy.

She says it is rare for her to paint and rare for her to do public art; she usually draws by hand on an iPad and publishes her work on the Internet.

“I was on the internet all the time for work and when my social life had to be on the internet too, I hit my threshold. It pushed me to put myself in my hands, to connect with people through art in a real way, to prepare to go back out into the world and be more connected. I learned what I really want to do.

For more information on submitting works for exhibition, visit www.ukiahpublicart.org or contact Marianne Davison at 707-467-5765, [email protected] or Annie Ruygt at [email protected]


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Two ‘Arcata Dudes’ Bring Unpretentious Art Gallery to Downtown A-Town | Lost Coast Outpost

The Arcata gallery on H Street in Arcata, of course! Window Resin by Eli Grant | Photos: Stéphanie McGeary

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The city center of Arcata will soon have a new place where artists can display their work and art lovers can buy it (or at least contemplate it). works by local artists.

The two artists themselves, gallery owners Eli Grant and Matt Henderson said they had struggled to find places to display their art in the area. One of the missions of the Arcata Gallery, they said, is to be accessible to artists who may not feel that their work could be shown in other spaces.

“When I was starting out as an artist and looking for places to hang my work, I felt like a lot of places weren’t my style or my niche,” Grant told the Outpost earlier this week, as he and Henderson prepared the gallery for the grand opening. “We want to cater for everyone and all styles and be totally community oriented. ”


Henderson (left) and Grant pause to hang paintings

“[We want it to] just be a place where young artists can come in and feel like they belong, ”Henderson added.

But Henderson and Grant wanted to be clear that they aren’t just showing youth work and will be wearing paintings, sculptures, jewelry, and pottery from artists of all ages and backgrounds.

For the opening, the Arcata Gallery will feature five local artists – Henderson, who will exhibit his vibrant splash paintings; Grant, who pours psychedelic resin; Julian DeMark, who will be showing his birch woodblock prints, sculptures and engravings, Rob Busch and Ceak Kytrell, both of whom will be exhibiting their oil paintings.

You might recognize the work of Kytrell, who often paints and exhibits his work outdoors in Arcata Square or next to the Old Town Lookout. Grant and Henderson said as soon as they started launching the gallery, they knew right away they wanted to show Kytrell’s work. “He’s a hard-working painter and he’s trying to jump right into the art world,” Grant said. “And I love his wit. By the time we approached him he was so ecstatic.


An oil painting by Ceak Kytrell

In addition to hosting art exhibitions, Grant and Henderson want the gallery to serve as a community gathering place (in a COVID-safe way, of course.) In the future, they hope to hold classes and events. workshops led by local artists, artisans, writers. and more.

When asked about the name of the gallery, Henderson and Grant said they just wanted something simple and to the point, but also felt it expressed their deep connection to the city and their desire to be community-driven.

“We’re both such Arcata dudes,” Grant told the Outpost. “We’ve both been hanging out in Arcata forever. We both grew up here. And we just felt like it would belong to the community. It’s not “the Matt and Eli gallery”, it’s “the Arcata gallery”.

The Arcata Gallery – located at 1063 H Street, next to Arcata Pizza & Deli – will open on Saturday, October 2 at 10 a.m. and will remain open until 9 p.m. There will be live music, food and drink starting at 4 p.m. Masks are mandatory. Regular gallery hours will be Tuesday to Saturday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

You can find out more or contact the owners by following The Arcata Gallery on Facebook or Instagram.


Woodcuts by Julian DeMark



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Wilkes Art Gallery Presents: Of Heart & Hand: An Exhibition of Fine Oil Paintings and Clay Art | Ashe

NORTH WILKESBORO – The Wilkes Art Gallery (WAG) is proud to announce an exhibition of the beautiful oil paintings of Ward Nichols and the clay art of Nick Schneider which will open on Friday, October 22 and end on Friday, December 17, 2021. Of Heart and Hand is just one of the many exhibits at WAG featuring the work of Nichols.

Nichols has been a full member of the Wilkes Art Gallery since moving to North Wilkesboro with his family in 1968. The staff and board of directors of the Wilkes Art Gallery are delighted to present the opening of this exhibition and invite you to join in our celebration of Nichols and Schneider’s work.

Ward Nichols is an internationally renowned painter from North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. Nichols uses his medium to create a visual recording of things appreciated only now that they have faded from the common imagination: the steam engines, the ancient trees and the singing houses and barns of rural America. La Revue Moderne says: “Ward Nichols presents very neat canvases which create a strongly poetic and sometimes surrealist atmosphere. He has achieved a total mastery of his art, allowing him to treat all subjects with an astonishing expressive and figurative power, he goes beyond simple reality.

Nichols has been painting for over fifty years. At ninety-two, he still works regularly in his home studio while playing loud-voiced jazz. His home, which he designed himself, is filled with original works of art by other artists, sculptors and potters. The walls of his studio are covered with photos from his many international trips as a stuffed vulture watches from his perch on Nichols’ easel. Not many people know that Ward is color blind and paints exactly what he sees. A board to help color blind people mix paints hangs in his studio – directly behind the stool Ward sits on to paint.

Ward Nichols has participated in over 200 group shows, 170 solo shows in ninety-four different galleries and museums in twenty-four states. He has been represented in more than forty-six national and international exhibitions. Throughout his career, he received more than thirty major awards, including the Grumbacher Award of Merit from the El Paso Art Museum. His work is in the collections of the Huntington Museum of Art (WVA), Springfield Museum of Art (MA), Daytona Speed ​​Museum (FL), El Paso Museum of Art (TX), Gutenberg Museum (Germany) and the Russell Museum (UK). Nichols’s work was

exhibited at the North Carolina Museum of Art, Birmingham Museum of Art (AL), Roanoke Fine Art Center (VA), Asheville Museum of Art (NC), Hickory Museum of Art (NC) and Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (NC).

Nick Schneider lives in Blowing Rock and is a Senior Art Instructor at Wilkes Community College in Wilkesboro. A long-time ceramist, he makes vases that are both functional and sculptural. Most of Schneider’s work is wood-fired in his train kiln, a style of pottery kiln that creates natural ash surfaces. Schnieder holds a Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics from the State University of New York in New Paltz, NY, and a Bachelor of Arts in English Language from the University of Montana. Prior to joining the WCC faculty, Schneider was a professor at Marymount Manhattan College from 2005-2011 and an instructor at Greenwich House Pottery, an art school in New York City, from 2004-2011.

About the Wilkes Art Gallery

Founded in 1962 in the living room of Annie Winkler’s home, the Wilkes Art Gallery is now housed in the historic North Wilkesboro Post Office building dating from 1925. The original facade of the post office remains, but the interior s ‘is transformed into a 10,000 square foot facility comprising over 3,500 square feet of exhibition space, an education center with a full ceramic studio, painting and drawing studios, two multi-purpose classrooms and a gift shop with works of regional craftsmen. WAG is a non-profit arts organization that believes art enriches our community and the lives of residents of Wilkes County. WAG offers a variety of classes for all ages, workshops and eight art exhibitions throughout the year. We partner with community organizations for special outreach projects and entrance to the gallery is always free.

The Wilkes Art Gallery is located at 913 C Street, North Wilkesboro, NC 28659. The museum is open Tuesday through Friday 10 am to 5 pm and Saturday 10 am to 2 pm. www.wilkesartgallery.org.


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Lady Amelia Windsor leads the glamor as she steps out in an art gallery

Lady Amelia Windsor and Princess Diana’s twin nieces Lady Amelia and Lady Eliza Spencer put on a trendy display as they stepped out into a London art gallery tonight.

Dressed to impress, the three socialites attended the Little Frank and His Carp exhibition at the Elizabeth Xi Bauer Gallery.

“The exhibition explores how architecture and seduction inform artistic practices,” according to the gallery’s website.

Lady Amelia Windsor (pictured) and Princess Diana’s twin nieces Lady Amelia and Lady Eliza Spencer put on a trendy display as they stepped out into a London art gallery tonight

Lady Amelia Spencer

Lady Eliza Spencer

Princess Diana’s twin nieces Lady Amelia (pictured left) and Lady Eliza Spencer (pictured right) looked stylish at the event

Amelia, 26, who is 43rd in line to the British throne, showcased her fashion prowess in a blue top and red pants combo.

Seeking effortless style, Amelia opted for a halter neck bodice, paired with red wide leg pants.

She finished the look with a silver clutch and added a touch of glitter with a glamorous gold necklace. The royal model kept her hair down and sported stylish makeup.

Meanwhile, Princess Diana’s stunning twin nieces Lady Amelia and Lady Eliza Spencer, both 29, stacked the glamor in black and white ensembles.

Lady Amelia, who recently moved from Cape Town to London with her fiance Greg Mallett, looked chic in a white silk top and black pants.

Dressed to impress, the three socialites attended the Little Frank and his Carp exhibit at the Elizabeth Xi Bauer Gallery

Dressed to impress, the three socialites attended the Little Frank and his Carp exhibit at the Elizabeth Xi Bauer Gallery

“The exhibition explores how architecture and seduction inform artistic practices,” according to the gallery's website.  Pictured, Lady Amelia Windsor

“The exhibition explores how architecture and seduction inform artistic practices,” according to the gallery’s website. Pictured, Lady Amelia Windsor

Her twin looked equally stylish in a black blazer with a sparkly lining, matching pants and blouse.

She finished off her look with a black clutch bag and an eye-catching silver necklace while keeping her hair down.

Amelia and Eliza, who both signed with Storm Model Management, are eager to realize their longtime ambitions now that they both live 20 minutes apart in London.

Amelia hopes to become a wedding planner and Eliza dreams of being an interior designer.

They grew up with their father and mother Victoria Aitken in Constantia, but spent a lot of time in the UK after their parents separated and Charles returned to the family headquarters, Althorp.

Princess Diana's stunning twin nieces Lady Amelia and Lady Eliza Spencer (pictured), both 29, piled on glamor in black and white ensembles

Princess Diana’s stunning twin nieces Lady Amelia and Lady Eliza Spencer (pictured), both 29, piled on glamor in black and white ensembles

Lady Amelia, who recently moved from Cape Town to London with her fiance Greg Mallett, looked chic in a white silk top and black pants (pictured)

Lady Amelia, who recently moved from Cape Town to London with her fiance Greg Mallett, looked chic in a white silk top and black pants (pictured)

Her twin looked equally stylish in a black blazer with sparkly lining, matching pants and blouse (pictured)

Her twin looked equally stylish in a black blazer with sparkly lining, matching pants and blouse (pictured)

They have two half-sisters and half-brothers from their father’s second and third marriages, and a half-brother from their mother’s second marriage.

Meanwhile, Lady Amelia Windsor often receives praise for her taste for fashion and regularly posts her style advice on her Instagram page, as well as collaborations with brands, most notably with fine jewelry specialist Alice van Cal.

Explaining why this is her favorite social media platform, Amelia said, “It allows everyone to be creative and imaginative.

“I also love that we can share all the beautiful and meaningful things we see and hear in the world. I find it so inspiring and inspiring.

Amelia (pictured) and Eliza, who are both signed to Storm Model Management, look forward to realizing their longtime ambitions now that they both live 20 minutes apart in London.

Amelia (pictured) and Eliza, who are both signed to Storm Model Management, look forward to realizing their longtime ambitions now that they both live 20 minutes apart in London.

Amelia (pictured), 26, who is 43rd in line to the British throne, showcased her fashion prowess in a blue top and red pants combo

Amelia (pictured), 26, who is 43rd in line to the British throne, showcased her fashion prowess in a blue top and red pants combo

The party girl, granddaughter of the Duke of Kent – the Queen’s first cousin, made headlines in Tatler magazine and is also a regular at London Fashion Week, having made her mark at the 90th anniversary party of the queen in 2016.

Once nicknamed the most beautiful member of the royal family, Lady Amelia is currently signed with Storm models, which represent Kate Moss and Cara Delevingne.

Lady Amelia has also posed for Dolce & Gabbana and designed her own line of accessories in collaboration with Penelope Chilvers.

Editor-in-chief of Tatler magazine, she also reportedly interned at the Bulgari jewelry house while studying at the University of Edinburgh.

In town: Lottie Moss led the stars to the Little Frank And His Carp private exhibition at the Elizabeth Xi Bauer Gallery in London on Thursday evening

In town: Lottie Moss led the stars to the Little Frank And His Carp private exhibition at the Elizabeth Xi Bauer Gallery in London on Thursday evening


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Sales at the 4 Flavors Art Gallery reception support Montclair Local

An opening reception for the work of graffiti artist Sen2 Figueroa at the 4 Flavors Art Gallery will help support Montclair Local Nonprofit News. (COURTESY 4 FLAVORS ART GALLERY)

4 Flavors Art Gallery will donate 10% of the proceeds of any sale on October 13 – at the opening reception for an exhibition featuring graffiti artist Sen2 Figueroa – to Montclair Local Nonprofit News.

The gallery will also ask for a suggested donation from the Montclair local at the door – a recommended “ticket” cost of $ 100 or $ 150. Donations to Montclair Local are tax deductible.

Montclair Local needs your support!

“For nearly three decades, Sen2 has continually sought new ways to create meaningful graffiti works, whether in the outdoor space with its murals, or through canvases and prints,” the gallery said in an announcement from the reception.

The exhibition will be on view from October 15 to 31.

Montclair Local is different from most news organizations – it is a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit, dependent on community support and currently operating at a loss. Most of its expenses go directly to paying the salaries of full-time and part-time journalists, further supported by freelance writers and photographers. Printing and delivering the weekly newspaper accounts for most of the rest.

Montclair Local strives to be the newspaper of the community – working to make government more transparent, to celebrate all that makes Montclair great, to reflect the diverse lived experiences of the people who make Montclair their home. It’s a long and expensive endeavor and a gamble – that the people of Montclair will find local journalism important enough, worthy of support, to help the newspaper survive as so many hometown trade newspapers have significantly downsized or closed. completely.

It’s a bet that the newspaper’s founding editor and biggest donor, Heeten Choxi, and other supporters think is worth taking, because they believe the community gets better by being well informed.

For Montclair Local staff members, offers like this one from 4 Flavors – to support the information operation with a fundraiser – is a welcome sign that the hard work they do is important.

For three decades, Sen2 Figueroa, formerly Sandro Figueroa García (b.1969, Puerto Rico), sought new ways to create meaningful graffiti, whether in the outdoor space with his murals, or through canvases. and impressions.

“In the 1980s, Sen2’s fascination with graffiti, colors and letters took hold of his dreams,” 4 Flavors wrote in his announcement of the event. “He took his passion for graffiti, color and lettering to the streets of New York. There he began to cultivate his love for street art, creating graffiti murals and commercial works. It was at this point in his life that he met and joined the most famous graffiti team ever assembled in the world: Tats Cru.

Their joint work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian, Art Basel, the Boston Center for the Arts, several times in Europe and as part of the “Urban Art Biennial 2013” ​​at the Rammelsberg Museum in Germany.

Sen2’s work has evolved to include mixed media works on paper and canvas, according to the gallery.

“He went from classic New York graffiti art to a combination of graphic lettering styles with 3D elements and abstract art techniques. All of Sen2’s pieces contain graffiti elements to reflect his artistic roots, as well as his sophisticated and ever-evolving style, ”says the ad. “His work creates an entertaining dialogue between color and movement. Sen2 blurs the lines between graffiti and fine art. Its magnificent chaos of modern and contemporary interpretations has created a signature style.

Sen2’s most recent work, Mecanico, Sen2 was influenced by the Bauhaus movement and the color theory of Joseph Albers. It focuses on “the evolution of graffiti towards a mechanical style” and “the crisp use of blurred lines with a bold use of color, and subtle blends collide intensely among a variation of textures,” according to the gallery.

4 Flavors is located at 204, avenue Bellevue in Montclair. The opening night reception starts at 6:00 p.m.

Contributions to Montclair Local can be made at any time at MontclairLocal.news/dons.

– Louis C. Hochman


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Unique art gallery ends soon

HANCOCK, Mich. (WLUC) – Artists Khari Turner and Ashante Kindle will hold a closing session Thursday for their art gallery titled “Copper Planted Seeds”.

Closing begins at 7:00 p.m. on September 30 at Finlandia University Art Gallery. The artists will speak closer to 7.20 p.m.

Turner’s work consists of abstract and realistic paintings that use water from oceans, lakes and rivers to show what it means to be human.

Kindle’s style differs from Turner’s in that it creates pieces that play with depth and light reflection.

Her pieces are inspired by the way copper oxidizes and she also incorporates the culture of dark hair into her works.

“The mines here, a little bit about the environment,” Turner said. “School models [and] think about change and growth.

Kindle and Turner add that their work reflects the beginning of the land of copper. They say he is influenced by the idea that slaves and Finns both migrate north for better living conditions.

“With the show called ‘Copper Planted Seeds’ we wanted to reflect on the history of copper in this area,” Kindle said.

The story behind the title “Copper Planted Seeds” tells of how migrants are said to braid seeds in their hair before traveling. This way, when the migrants arrived at their new destination, they would have seeds to plant, even if they could not carry much.

Both artists have been working very hard on their pieces and are looking forward to meeting members of the community on Thursday evening.

Copyright 2021 WLUC. All rights reserved.


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CDU Art Gallery’s new exhibition builds on experience

Charles Darwin University Art Collection and Gallery Curator Dr Joanna Barrkman (right) and Honors Bachelor of Arts student Kezia Dilettoso (left) at the latest exhibition at the CDU, from the CDU Art Collection.

New exhibition at the Charles Darwin University (CDU) Art Gallery from the CDU Art Collection features sketches, drawings, illustrations and works on paper from 1976 to present which draw on the experience of local and international artists.

DRAWN reinforces the importance of drawing as a fundamental technique of artistic practice, showcasing works of art that are eclectic in style, scale and content, executed in pencil, pencil, ink, pen, in charcoal, pastel, conté and even photocopy toner.

Open to the public from September 30 to February 26, 2022 – the exhibition features 60 works by 30 Australian and Indonesian artists, acquired by the University since 1980.

CDU Art Collection and Gallery Curator Dr Joanna Barrkman said the new exhibit shows the diversity of drawing works by local and international artists in the university’s art collection. .

“Through the lens of the drawings, we see the progression of the gallery’s collection of drawings from the earliest days to the present day,” said Dr Barrkman.

“Some of the 30 artists are past or present students or teachers at CDU, and the exhibition showcases their work and talent.”

DRAWN implicitly documents the history of the CDU art collection, with many on display drawings acquired in the early 1980s by the Darwin Community College Art Committee.

It features works by nationally renowned Australian artists such as Peter Booth, a figurative and surreal painter, Mandy Martin, artist and art teacher at Australian National University from 1988 to 2003, Mike Parr, a performance artist and printmaker. internationally renowned, and Richard Goodwin, artist and architect.

More recently, the CDU Art Collection has increasingly focused on territorial artists, many of whom are represented in DRAWN.

In addition to exhibiting artwork, DRAWN also brings the community together by providing space for a wide variety of drawing classes taught by local artists in October.

“The gallery thus connects to the community and shows that drawing is not reserved for the elite. It is a meeting space for community engagement, ”said Dr Barrkman.

These figure, landscape, portrait, experimental marking and botanical drawing workshops are open to beginners and experienced alike.

Drawing lessons will be held in a corner of the gallery with all art supplies provided for 15-20 participants.

From the CDU art collection will be inaugurated by the Minister of Education, the Hon. Lauren Moss at the CDU Art Gallery in Building Orange 12, Casuarina Campus on Wednesday September 29 at 6 p.m.

DRAWN is organized by Dr Joanna Barrkman and Sarah Pirrie. The CDU Art Gallery is open Wednesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Reservations for the drawing workshops are available here.


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2nd Ave. Art Guild presents an art gallery of children’s books

Works of art depicting a children’s story are on display at 2nd Ave. Art Guild in Dodge City.

On Friday, September 24, the gallery kicked off with the work of watercolor artist Mary Anne Hendrix who created several panels of artwork for a story titled “We’re Going to Kansas”.

According to the Arts Guild, the story, rooted in the history of the pioneers who settled in Kansas in the late 1800s, was written by Cimarron High School English teacher Lynne Hewes, illustrated by Hendrix, carved in “stone” by Luminous Neon of Dodge City, and set up as part of an indoor playground attraction at Cimarron Crossing Park in Cimarron.

The guild said Hendrix’s style is whimsical, with bright colors that create an sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant image of what the main character, a little girl, sees when her family’s Prairie Schooner visits Kansas.

“We had a great time with this project,” said Hendrix. “We actually decided to do another one, this time based on experiences on the Western Cattle Trail on the way to Dodge City.”

The watercolors of

Funding for the project comes from a grant from the Community Foundation of Southwest Kansas.

“They said it was one of the most interesting projects they’ve funded,” Hewes said. “This is probably the most unusual. The idea began when Beverly Benton, a social worker interested in history, decided that the park needed information to accompany its new “covered cart” attraction. She wanted the kids playing there to learn a little more about what that wagon stood for.

The town of Cimarron organized an “unveiling”, in the presence of representatives of the Santa Fe Trail Association, once the signs were created and installed.

After the painting was revealed, the children approached and began to read the story.

“That’s what I envisioned for it,” Benton said.

Hendrix’s watercolors are still on display at 2nd Ave. Art Guild.

To contact the writer, email [email protected]


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